ENDORSEMENT: Matthews-Matz Is the Only Choice to Tackle Tuition

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The emergence of an outsider ticket is nothing short of commonplace in GUSA’s annual executive election race. The occurrence of an outsider ticket focused intently on the issue of college affordability, however, is quite rare.

John Matthews (COL ’18) and Nick Matz (COL ’18) are the only candidates in this race with a clear-eyed vision of their role as GUSA executives and a serious plan to combat rising tuition costs.

Today, Georgetown tuition for the 2016-2017 academic year stands at $49,968, not including fees such as room and board. Since 2001, tuition has increased every year, growing at an average rate of 4.5% annually. Without pushback from students, these costs will only continue to rise.

In January, when Georgetown increased tuition by 3.5% to $51,720, GUSA President Enushe Khan argued that the increase was unpopular but necessary. Khan told The Hoya that students would “tangibly benefit” from the tuition increase through renovations and increases in staff.

“The university seems to be on the same page as students,” she said.

While we share Ms. Khan’s assessment of the unpopularity of tuition increases, we refuse to accept that such increases are to the benefit of the student body. When it comes to tuition, the university is certainly not on the same page as students.


John Matthews (COL ’18) and Nick Matz (COL ’18) are the only candidates in this race with a clear-eyed vision of their role as GUSA executives and a serious plan to combat rising tuition costs.


Matthews and Matz have staked their campaign on one clear objective: putting money back into students’ pockets. They describe this election as a “referendum on rising tuition costs.”

To combat these costs, they plan to dramatically cut excessive GUSA spending and to advocate for other short-term reforms including ending the mandatory Yates fee, reforming student health insurance and performing more thorough audits of activity funding.

In addition to reducing administrative costs, they plan to work with professors to lower the cost of required textbooks.

We admit that some of these policies require fine-tuning, but we are heartened by the singularity of purpose that Matthews and Matz can bring to GUSA.

To those sounding the alarms of impending doom, we insist that you take a pause.

Georgetown will not burn because GUSA outsiders are at the helm.

The truth is that tackling tuition and burdensome student debt will not be easy. The attention John Matthews and Nick Matz can bring to the issue of college affordability and to rethinking how GUSA operates will be far more beneficial than any one policy or proposal.

While tuition has increased over the past decade, middle class wages have not kept up—putting schools like Georgetown further out of reach for middle and lower income families.

Some argue that GUSA has been successful in recent tuition negotiations. We’ve heard it said: “The tuition increase would have been 5%, if GUSA had not acted!”

Put simply, that’s not good enough.

For too long, GUSA executives have tried to be everything to everyone—and end up meaning very little to anyone.

Matthews and Matz have a chance to do one thing of consequence for students today and generations of Hoyas tomorrow: changing the conversation about tuition and spending at Georgetown.

We welcome this much-needed change.

Vote Matthews-Matz on February 23.

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